Why Fast Food SEX Is Making You Sick and Tired

It isn’t exactly breaking news that fast food is bad for you.

We all know it. 

But it isn’t exactly breaking news that fast food SEX is bad for you.

Most of us have never considered it.

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Even the most ardent hater of Brussels sprouts and broccoli has a hard time arguing that a bacon cheeseburger and order of large fries washed down with an extra-large, collectable plastic cup filled with high-fructose corn syrup seems like a healthy meal. 

But even the most impatient skeptic of slow, luxurious sex has a hard time arguing that a quickie seems like a healthy connection.

Fast food has a terrible reputation. And for good reason: It’s really unhealthy, and if you eat a lot of it, not only will you gain weight, you’ll also end up sick and tired.

Fast food SEX doesn’t have a terrible reputation. In most circles, it’s the only option. And for good reason: WE DON’T KNOW ANY BETTER. Unfortunately, it’s really unhealthy, and if you have a lot of it, not only will you feel disconnected, you’ll also end up sick and tired. 

When we eat, say, a nice piece of salmon with some quinoa and steamed vegetables, we’re getting vital nutrients from every component of that meal: omega-3s from the fish, protein and fiber from the quinoa, and a host of vitamins and minerals from the vegetables. And while a five-ounce fillet of salmon actually contains more fat and calories than a McDonald’s cheeseburger, it’s the quality of that fat and those calories that counts, and that’s where fast food falls short.

When we talk, let’s say, about our fears and desires around sex, we’re getting vital information and connection from every component of that interaction: blocks that hold us back, things we want, and a healthy dose of trust-building and compassion. And while talking actually takes time away from having sex, it’s the quality of that exchange that counts, and that’s where fast food sex falls short.

It’s a bit of a trap to think that when you’re looking to eat healthy, counting calories is all that matters. If you limit your overall calorie intake and amp up your workout regimen you’ll most likely lose weight, but it’s not just about calories; overall nutrition is the key to lasting well-being. A salmon fillet contains vitamin B12, vitamin D, vitamin B6, selenium, omega-3 fatty acids, protein, phosphorus, choline, pantothenic acid, biotin, and potassium. A McDonald’s cheeseburger contains some iron, protein, and five grams of saturated fat. Calorie for calorie, which one seems like the healthier choice?

It’s a bit of a trap to think that when you’re looking to have a healthy relationship, counting the number of times you have sex in a week is all the matters. If you increase the number of times you have sex per week you’ll most likely see your partner more, but it’s not just about how often you have sex; overall connection is the key to a lasting relationship. A quality sexual experience contains trust, boundaries, connection, pleasure, compassion, and fluidity. An 8-minute session may contain some physical touching, penetration, and a climax. Moment for moment, which one seems like a more satisfying choice?

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And don’t forget, this goes beyond weighing the more obvious health benefits of beef versus salmon. Commercial buns are made with enriched flour, high fructose corn syrup, stabilizers, conditioners, and preservatives, none of which offer much in the way of nutrition. Compare their health benefits to whole-grain bread and, well, there is no comparison. The closer to nature a food is, the healthier it will be, and few things are farther from nature than fast food. 

I don’t want you to forget this goes beyond weighing quantity versus quality. Get-it-done sex comes from a place of “should,” desperation, and pressure to perform, none of which offer much in the way of long-lasting connection. Compare its benefits to sex with mind, body, and heart integration and, well, there is no comparison. The closer to human nature sex is, the more pleasurable it will be, and few things are farther from our natural instinct to connect than fast food sex. 

So what does this have to do with making you feel sick and tired? A whole lot, as it turns out. What we put into our bodies plays a huge role in how we feel day in and day out, for a wide variety of reasons. Whether you need to explain the why of “no” to fast-food loving kids, inform friends and family, or just inform yourself of the dangers of fast food, here are eight reasons why it does so much more harm than good.

So what does this have to do with making you feel sick and tired? A whole lot, as it turns out. How we use our bodies plays a huge role in how we feel day in and day out, for a wide variety of reasons. Whether you need to explain the why of “no” to fast-food-sex loving partners, inform friends and family, or just inform yourself of the dangers of fast food sex, there are many reasons why it does so much more harm than good.

Can you name a few?

Come on over to my Facebook page and share why fast food sex is making you sick and tired. Tell me how you WANT your sex to feel, and I'll share with you how you can get there.

Wishing you whole body, whole mind, wholehearted, satisfying sex,
Daniela

Content from Dan Meyers' piece 8 Reasons Why Fast Food Is Making You Sick and Tired is artistically used in this article to compare fast food and fast food sex.